More power to your palette


IMG_2882My local shopping strip has recently mounted a campaign to get us all to shop locally.  It’s interesting how the campaign organisers have presented variations on the same message.

  • You can’t buy happiness, but you can buy local, and that’s kind of the same thing;
  • “Keep calm and buy local!”; and
  • Did you know if you spend $100 at a local business instead of at a chain store that would put an extra $3 million into our local economy?  It would also create thousands of jobs every year.

Some of the local retailers have also entered into the spirit, displaying signs that say “Local is the new black”, or “Shopping at Chadstone is so last-season”.  This is the power of palette, where you express the same message in different ways to appeal to different members of your audience.  Multiple palettes create interest, energy and traction for your messages.

Matt Church, the founder of Thought Leaders Global, talks about an informal palette and a formal palette as ways of ensuring your messages hit home.  For example, a formal palette for a message could be: “Storytelling helps leaders lift engagement with their audience.”  An informal palette could be: ‘Storytelling rocks your listener’s world!”

So much of our communication focuses squarely on just one palette and this can be frustrating for communicators, who often despair that people are just not getting it.  Try to spread your message across a range of palettes and see your success rate dramatically jump.  As for me, I’m off to shop locally.

Please comment, I love sharing your insights.

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4 Comments
  • Sundar Rajamanickam
    Reply

    In the technology world the jargons are too heavy. At such times, I have heard some presenters use a story to quickly convey the message and advantages to a disparate audience. Stories, truly are the way to have the best reach to the audience.

    • Yamini Naidu
      Reply

      Sundar you are spot on. It takes courage to break through the jargon and try something different. But if you want to truly connect with your audience and make them care about your message, then storytelling is the choice you have to make.
      Regards
      Yamini

  • Reply

    Excellent way to promote the buy local theme in the neighbourhoods and no doubt by you sharing this initiative will create a spark of interest in other communities across the country. I just wanted to share a little experience I have had. Years ago I lived in the inner city of Sydney and the local chamber of commerce and the local business owners did a similar theme for the business community. They even had simple signs that read “support local businesses”, “live local, work local, play local” and then had some fun with signs like “doggy meeting place” over the communal dogs water bowl, among other softer messages and the very high impact of “Thank you”. This was all backed by the local shops greeting with a smile, some were paying for the parking metres of their customers or people at random, smiles and a genuine attitude of thank you created a good vibe. It was such a good shopping experience that most of the community jumped on it.

    • Yamini Naidu
      Reply

      That is wonderful to hear Matt and thanks for sharing. One of my favourites from this campaign is ‘Put your money where your house is!’. Hopefully it pays off and works for our local retail strip.
      Regards
      Yamini

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