Mission Possible: 3 Fail proof ways to remember names


Yamini Naidu, Business Storytelling

“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” is one of William Shakespeare’s famous lines from Romeo and Juliet.

But, I’m sure you will agree that, in business, your name matters and you don’t want to be called by the wrong name. Remembering and using people’s names is the most powerful and authentic way to build connections. Yet, sadly, most people claim that they are hopeless with names.

If you are reading this, chances are we have worked together. My clients always comment on how good I am with names (and how brilliant I am with storytelling!). Surprisingly, I get very few comments on my modesty, but remembering names always impresses.

Here are some things that work for me:

Channel Bob and Barrack
So often, whether it is a new exercise program or a tool, our mindset matters. I am going to ask you to adopt a useful belief: honing your name recall is a skill, and we can all get better at it. It’s literally a muscle that you can grow. So channel Bob the Builder (and the slogan used by the 2008 Barack Obama presidential campaign) and respond with “Yes we can!”

Anchor in your senses
When you hear someone’s name, you need to anchor it in your senses.Kinaesthetically in physical contact, a handshake works best. You hear their name so your auditory senses are engaged. Another anchoring method is repeating their name back to them while maintaining constant eye contact, thereby using your aural and visual senses. When you repeat their name back make sure it is not done in a creepy way! And don’t try too hard. Weave their name back in a sentence such as ‘*|FNAME|*, thank you for reading this.’

If you’ve never been very good at names, you probably didn’t use these anchor points. It is important to use at least 3 senses, otherwise it is like trying to pitch a tent with only one peg. While anchoring in your senses is pretty failproof, the downside is that if you get a name wrong, that gets anchored too and is hard (but not impossible) to rewire!

Practice
Finally, it’s all about practice. Start with two names today–your barista and the IT help desk person. And then build on it.

So your mission should you choose/decide to accept it, is to try these strategies. And please comment, I love hearing from you.

P.S. My personal best is 100 names in a room. I know!!

Revenge of the analogue?


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Every year, I do an annual holiday with my oldest childhood friends. A ‘girls only’ holiday, no partners or kids. It’s definitely one of the highlights of my year. Last year, one of my friends brought some of the letters we had written to each other when we were teenagers. We read the letters aloud to each other, all of us often convulsing in fits of laughter. Oh, the angst of being 18, our ability to make mountains out of molehills and the all-important self-aggrandizement.

The smell of the old letter paper, the faded and splotchy ink on the page and the now-obsolete aerograms brought back a flood of memories.

We may never see the rise of the handwritten letter again, but we are starting to see a new dance with the analogue: the resurgence of vinyl records, the soaring sales of moleskin notebooks and even the revival of film, as in film for your camera. Interestingly, this isn’t just fuelled by the nostalgia of middle-aged customers but actually driven by a new breed of younger consumers.

David Sax, in Revenge of the Analogue: Real things and why they matter, explains, ‘surrounded by the digital, we now crave experiences that are more tactile, and human centric.’

This isn’t a call to embrace our inner ‘Luddite,’ for those of us who still have one, that is. It’s actually quite the opposite. It’s a recognition that big business has thrown out the analogue baby with the bathwater. So, when we design high-tech digital strategies, what are some high-touch analogue things we can do for our customers? Every business definitely needs a digital strategy, but, if you were to map an analogue strategy, what would it look like?

Please comment; I would love to hear from you!